The End of the Story

Several weeks ago, I completed a Bible study with some amazing sisters in Christ on the book “The Storm Inside” by Sheila Walsh.  One week, we studied the transformation from insecurity to confidence using the story of Ruth.  The first chapter of homework for the week was on the story of David and Goliath from 1 Samuel 17:

One day Jesse said to David, “Take this basket of roasted grain and these ten loaves of bread, and carry them quickly to your brothers. And give these ten cuts of cheese to their captain. See how your brothers are getting along, and bring back a report on how they are doing.”  David’s brothers were with Saul and the Israelite army at the valley of Elah, fighting against the Philistines.

So David left the sheep with another shepherd and set out early the next morning with the gifts, as Jesse had directed him. He arrived at the camp just as the Israelite army was leaving for the battlefield with shouts and battle cries. Soon the Israelite and Philistine forces stood facing each other, army against army. David left his things with the keeper of supplies and hurried out to the ranks to greet his brothers. As he was talking with them, Goliath, the Philistine champion from Gath, came out from the Philistine ranks. Then David heard him shout his usual taunt to the army of Israel.

As soon as the Israelite army saw him, they began to run away in fright.  “Have you seen the giant?” the men asked. “He comes out each day to defy Israel. The king has offered a huge reward to anyone who kills him. He will give that man one of his daughters for a wife, and the man’s entire family will be exempted from paying taxes!”

David asked the soldiers standing nearby, “What will a man get for killing this Philistine and ending his defiance of Israel? Who is this pagan Philistine anyway, that he is allowed to defy the armies of the living God?”

And these men gave David the same reply. They said, “Yes, that is the reward for killing him.”

But when David’s oldest brother, Eliab, heard David talking to the men, he was angry. “What are you doing around here anyway?” he demanded. “What about those few sheep you’re supposed to be taking care of? I know about your pride and deceit. You just want to see the battle!”

“What have I done now?” David replied. “I was only asking a question!” He walked over to some others and asked them the same thing and received the same answer. Then David’s question was reported to King Saul, and the king sent for him.

“Don’t worry about this Philistine,” David told Saul. “I’ll go fight him!”

“Don’t be ridiculous!” Saul replied. “There’s no way you can fight this Philistine and possibly win! You’re only a boy, and he’s been a man of war since his youth.”

But David persisted. “I have been taking care of my father’s sheep and goats,” he said. “When a lion or a bear comes to steal a lamb from the flock, I go after it with a club and rescue the lamb from its mouth. If the animal turns on me, I catch it by the jaw and club it to death. I have done this to both lions and bears, and I’ll do it to this pagan Philistine, too, for he has defied the armies of the living God! The lord who rescued me from the claws of the lion and the bear will rescue me from this Philistine!”

Saul finally consented. “All right, go ahead,” he said. “And may the lord be with you!”

Then Saul gave David his own armor—a bronze helmet and a coat of mail.  David put it on, strapped the sword over it, and took a step or two to see what it was like, for he had never worn such things before.

“I can’t go in these,” he protested to Saul. “I’m not used to them.” So David took them off again. He picked up five smooth stones from a stream and put them into his shepherd’s bag. Then, armed only with his shepherd’s staff and sling, he started across the valley to fight the Philistine.

First, my homework asked, “What reasons do you see for David to be insecure?”  Well – Goliath’s size, armor, and weaponry…..the taunting he was doing…..the fact that everyone else was afraid.  Then it asks, “If you didn’t know the end of the story, what would go through your mind if you heard someone talking and acting the way David did?”  My gut reaction? I would think he was crazy and going to get killed.

I’m certain there are a lot of people who think we are crazy….who think this is all some delusion in our heads.  But you know what?  They don’t know the end of the story.  I dream of a day when Jahar’s beautiful testimony of coming to Christ will be told and when someone will stop to ask, “What would go through your mind if you heard people talking and acting the way those called to pray for Jahar did, if you didn’t know the end of the story?”

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One Response to The End of the Story

  1. Bri says:

    “What would go through your mind if you heard people talking and acting the way those called to pray for Jahar did, if you didn’t know the end of the story?” They’re delusional and don’t realize how impossible it is for him to be saved.

    But the voice of truth says, “With man this is impossible, but with God, all things are possible.”

    And since I kind of just referenced it:

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